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  1. Rhododendrons - March 10, 1961 Life magazine

    Rhododendrons - March 10, 1961 Life magazine

    Exerpt from March 10, 1961 Life Magazine

    Bold Colors, Hardy Growth for Showiest Schrub.

    The rhododendron is a shrub that took 50 million years to acquire its present beauty, handsome foliage and clustered flowers that have made it a garden favorite. But until recently the brightest and densest rhododendrons needed a moist, mild climate. Northeastermandinland rhododendrons have mostly been straggly with pale, smallish flowers. Now hybridizers have developed beautiful plants that are hardy in cold climates which such hybrids could never endure before. The two new rhododendrons shown above on the Cascade Mountains of Washington are King of Shrubs a low, wide-spreading bush with orange flowers. and Smoky a tall rhododendron unique in flower color. These will grow in the Northwest, northern California and milder sections of the cast. Four new hybrids that are hardy in all the cast and some inland sections are on following pages. They are spectacular bushes yet tough enough to stand 25° below zero winters. Instructions for planting –early spring is the best time.

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  2. Scottie is Best Dog in the U.S. - February 26, 1945 Issue

    Scottie is Best Dog in the U.S. - February 26, 1945 Issue

    "ALEX" Wins Westminster Show

    Last week Madison Square Garden in New York City literally howled with dogs. More than 2,500 of them. from dachshunds to barkless Basenjis, jammed into the Garden to compete in the 69th annual Westminster Dog Show. After two days of posing dogs, looking at their teeth and feeling their chests the judges finally picked a short-coupled, bushy-browed Scottie named Shieling's Signature as the best of them all.

    Nicknamed "Alex," he will be 3 years old next May 10 and is the first of his breed to win the coveted Westminster Best in Show Award since 1911 when it was won by a Scottie named Champion Tickle Em Jock. Alex won because of his broad, deep chest, his magnificent head and his harsh, weather-resistant coat, important points in a Scottie.

    Another reason was Alex's showmanship. He demonstrated that, contrary to a common conception that they are dour animals.animals, Scotties can be very happy dogs. Only two days before Alex had lost in the Scottish Terrier Show and his Westminster victory was a surprise. His personality made the difference this time. Said a judge, “He kept asking for it every minute."

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  3. Sled Riding

    Sled Riding

    FLYING SAUCERS. (From the Feb. 14, 1955 Life magazine.)

    Few big cities anywhere plunge more whole-heartedly into the pleasures of winter than Minneapolis. Every weekend during the winter some 110,000 Minneapolitans stream into the city's many large parks where there are fine steep slopes for coasting. When the snow is fresh and heavy, small fry by the hundred- and a smattering of nostalgic larger fry deploy over the hills of such popular parks as Powderhorn Lake and Theodore Wirth. They have dozens of sleds, but the...Read the rest of this Life magazine article

     

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  4. Spring on the Farm in Pennsylvania - May 24, 1943

    Spring on the Farm in Pennsylvania - May 24, 1943

    Exerpt from May 24, 1943 Life magazine

    Spring on the Farm in Pa.

    Spring came late to much of the U. S. soil this year. In Lancaster County, Pa.. the month of April felt like March, and the first few days of May were like a cold and cloudy April. Then, within the last fortnight, the tardy spring came racing up the Shenandoah Valley from the South. Apple orchards burst into foamy pink-and-white bloom around the fat Lancaster County barns and spic-and-span farmhouses. Tractors and teams crawled across the Lancaster County fields, churning the limestone-bedded soil into a carpet of soft, deep loam. In the barnyards pungent clouds of steam rose where farmers were gathering up the winter's deposit of precious manure (see nect page). The pictures on this and the following pages show how the spring of 1943 looks in Lancaster County, richest farming county east of the Rocky Mountains. (Los Angeles County, Calif., which has a far more favorable climate, is first in agricultural production per farm acre; Lancaster is second.) Spring in Pennsylvania has a different look than spring in California or spring in Kansas. But wherever it is and whenever it comes, spring on the farm always finds men and animals and weather working together to renew the riches of the earth

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  5. Spring on the Farm- May 24, 1943 Life Magazine

    Spring on the Farm- May 24, 1943 Life Magazine

    Exerpt from May 24, 1943 Life Magazine.

    Trip to a Pennsylvania Farm

    Spring came late to much of the U. S. soil this year. In Lancaster County, Pa.. the month of April felt like March, and the first few days of May were like a cold and cloudy April. Then, within the last fortnight, the tardy spring came racing up the Shenandoah Valley from the South. Apple orchards burst into foamy pink-and-white bloom around the fat Lancaster County barns (see above) and spic-and-span farmhouses. Tractors and teams crawled across the Lancaster County fields, churning the limestone-bedded soil into a carpet of soft, deep loam. In the barnyards pungent clouds of steam rose where farmers were gathering up the winter's deposit of precious manure (see meat page). The pictures on this and the following pages show how the spring of 1943 looks in Lancaster County, richest farming county east of the Rocky Mountains. (Los Angeles County, Calif., which has a far more favorable climate, is first in agricultural production per farm acre: Lancaster is second.) Spring in Pennsylvania has a different look than spring in California or spring in Kansas. But wherever it is and whenever it comes, spring on the farm always finds men and animals and weather working together to renew the riches of the earth.

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  6. The Colorado River. - October 23, 1944 Life magazine

    The Colorado River. - October 23, 1944 Life magazine

    Exerpt from October 23, 1944 Life Magazine

    A Wild and Beautiful River is put to Work for Man

    The Colorado River, fifth longest in the U.S., is probably the wildest and most violently beautiful in the world. It is certainly one of the most useful. The expanding economy of the whole southwestern corner of the U.S. depends on it. At its source in Rocky Mountain National Park (see opposite page) the Colorado is clear and cold, fed by melting snow and dammed by beavers. As it flows southward, it gains strength and becomes yellow with mud. For 1,000 miles it rushes through a steepwalled gorge, which for an unbelievable 217 miles is called Grand Canyon. By the time it empties over great tidal flats into the Gulf of California it is broad and sullen, only partly controlled by levees. The strength which makes the Colorado dangerous is what makes it useful. The deep canyons it has cut are probably the best natural dam sites in the world. The river is first harnessed at a point about two thirds of the way from its headwaters, at Boulder Dam. Behind the dam a great blue lake, filled by the muddy river, turns the turbines which supply electricity to the war industry of the southwest. Below Boulder the river is plugged at Parker Dam, where part of it is drawn off to supply Los Angeles with water. Farther down, at Imperial Dam, it is tapped by canals which water one of America's richest agricultural areas, the Imperial and Yuma-Gila Valleys,

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  7. The Day the Yankees Fell into the Cellar. June 1, 1959 Life magazine

    The Day the Yankees Fell into the Cellar. June 1, 1959 Life magazine

    Exerpt from June 1, 1959 Issue.

    First Time in 19 Years Yankees are in Last Place

    The haughtiest heads in baseball were bowed in humiliation last week. on a day deservedly known in New York - Black Wednesday, the New York Yankees, pennant winners for nine out of the last 10 years, slumped without a murmur into a place they have not occupied in 19 year--the American League cellar. A few fans were loyal, but they were outnumbered 100 to 1 by a nationwide army of rabid Yankee-haters who for years had had to content themselves with fictional accounts of Yankee downfalls in Douglass Wallop's novel, The Year the Yankees Lost the Pennant, and it’s stage-screen versions. Damn Yankees. Now they could enjoy a far worse debacle than anyone, even wallop, had dared imagine. The Yankee misery began with the season less than a month-old. While losing a series of one-run games, they skidded into the second division and then the dam broke. The strange thing about their final dunking was that everybody, including the Yanks themselves, seemed to know it would happen. They were playing the Tigers, a constant thorn in their side, and on the hill was Frank Lary, the old Yankee-killer. Just before the game Yankee Manager Casey Stengel decided to save his star pitcher, Bob Turley, for another day. So began the debacle. If the Yanks had been beating themselves in previous games, now they seemed lent on self destruction. They threw the ball away, kicked it around, let 11 Tigers bat in one inning without changing pitchers. It was the most humiliating three hour-that Stengel ever sweated out in the dugout.

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  8. The Grand Canyon's Hidden Wonders.- May 14th 1956

    The Grand Canyon's Hidden Wonders.- May 14th 1956

    Exerpt from May 14, 1956 Life magazine

    Long Trek into the Chasm finds scenes of grandeur that few men have ever seen.

    The poetically beautiful cataract on the opposite page is only a few miles from one of the most visited scenic spots in the U.S. Yet it’s dancing waters are seldom seen-except by "the people of the blue-green water."the Havasupai Indians who live nearby. The Havasu Falls are 50 miles from Grand Canyon Village on the south rim of the Grand Canyon of the Colorado River, where nearly a million tourists go each year to view the titanic chasm. Most of them look, gasp admiringly and then depart. Some take the time to ride muleback to the canyon bottom and on to Phantom Ranch. Few ever wander into the great sunken wilderness that spreads through some 1.300 square miles of northwestern Arizona. While some people, mostly Indians, spend their lives in the mauve shadows of Grand Canyon, no one has ever explored all its myriad recesses or fathomed all its mysteries. In its entirety the Grand Canyon is quite beyond knowing, Some of the wonders of the canyon, like Havasu Falls, can be reached on muleback without too much difficulty. Others can be reached only by boat through the treacherous rapids of the Colorado River or by perilous climbs that tax the skill of mountain experts, Though the rangers at Grand Canyon National Park discourage exploration by the novice, there are dedicated adventurers who find canyon prowling an eternal challenge.

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  9. The Miracle of Dunkirk - February 14, 1949 Life magazine

    The Miracle of Dunkirk - February 14, 1949 Life magazine

     Exerpt from the February 14, 1949 Life Magazine

    "Dunkirk Beaches" painted by Richard Eurick

    In June 1940 the name of Dunkirk haunted the world. A sweeping German pincers movement, bursting through collapsing France and Belgium, had caught and pinned virtually all the British Expeditionary Force against the sea. On Dunkirk's broad beaches men as well as equipment seemed doomed beneath a rain of German fire and bombs. Rescue operations began immediately although Mr. Churchill himself dared not hope that more than a fraction of the army ANOTHER DUNKIRK was the evacuation from Corunna in Spain during Peninsular War, an attempt to dislodge Napoleon from Portugal and could be saved. But from England there put out a motley fleet of warships, tugs, yachts, small craft of every kind and, in Io days, they carried more than 338,000 British and French soldiers back to England. The miraculous evacuation recalled another time when a British army had been swept to the sea at Corunna in Spain, 131 years before. Then, in January 1809, a British transport fleet had snatched some 14,000 of Sir John Moore's troops from the forces of Napoleon. Spain. This old print, sketched on scene, shows British transports in Corunna harbor, a relatively peaceful sight in days before aircraft and high explosives.

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  10. The Phonograph is Celebrating it's 75th Year - November 17, 1952 - Life Magazine

    The Phonograph is Celebrating it's 75th Year - November 17, 1952 - Life Magazine

    First It Said "Mary"

    At this season of the year in 1877 a group of inventors and mechanics in a laboratory in New Jersey were in the midst of one of the most astonishing experiences in the history of man. They had before them a little machine, handmade for something less than $18, that could talk. It did not say much, its first word having been, as the world knows, Mary, followed by had a little lamb. Moreover it could do little else but talk, which makes it by modern standards a poor thing. But at that time and to those men, who had been listening to the machine since August and in November were still overwhelmed with awe, it was something in which the hand of God was clearly discernible. Thomas Edison, who had thought of it, called it a speaking phonograph. Just now his invention is old enough to have a diamond anniversary. Unlike almost all other great inventions, the phonograph had no antecedents. The idea simply evolved from scratch in Edison's great brain over a period of time. When Edison's thinking about his idea crystallized, he made a pen-and-ink sketch of it, scribbled make this in the corner and handed it to an assistant named John Kreusi, a skilled toolmaker who turned out the first models of many of his inventions. Kreusi dutifully made the thing, having only a dim idea of what it was intended to do and no confidence that it would do it. He finished his model on Aug. 15 and brought it to Edison in a spirit of great doubt, which did not diminish when that great man, who lacked the gift of phrase of Telegraph-Inventor Samuel F. B. (What hath God wrought?) Morse, began to bellow nursery rhymes into the recorder.

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